People

Matthew Schweitzer is the founder and editor of the Post-War Watch.

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Our Contributors

Renad Mansour is a Research Fellow at Chatham House’s Middle East and North Africa Programme and a Research Fellow at Cambridge University’s Security Initiative. He has previously served as an adviser to the Kurdistan Regional Government Civil Society Ministry between 2008 and 2010. He was interviewed for the P-WW about the evolution of Iraq’s Popular Mobilization Units.

Bilal Wahab is a Soref fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. Previously, he taught at the American University of Iraq in Sulaimani, where he founded the Center for Development and Natural Resources. He was interviewed for the P-WW about the challenges of Iraq’s oil economy and reconstruction post-ISIS and Iraqi Kurdistan’s troubled independence referendum.

Alex Mello is lead security analyst at Horizon Client Access, an advisory service working with the world’s leading energy companies. He was interviewed for the P-WW about the UAE’s Yemen operations and power projection in East Africa.

Michael Knights is a Lafer fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, specializing in the military and security affairs of Iraq, Iran, Yemen, and the Gulf Arab states. He was interviewed for the P-WW about the obstacles Iraq faces beyond ISISthe country’s deepening leadership crisis, and security challenges Baghdad must face after Mosul.

Barham A. Salih is the former Prime Minister of the Kurdistan Regional Government, former Deputy Prime Minister of the Iraqi Government, and Founder of the American University of Iraq, Sulaimani. He was interviewed about the political and economic challenges facing Iraqi Kurdistan after ISIS.

Sherri Kraham Talabany is the President and Executive Director of the Kurdistan-based SEED Foundation. She previously served 15 years in the US Government, including at the Department of State and Millennium Challenge Corporation, working on foreign assistance programming and international development. She was interviewed about mental healthcare and socio-economic recovery in Iraq.

Belkis Wille is a senior Iraq researcher in the Middle East and North Africa division at Human Rights Watch. She was interviewed for the P-WW about human rights challenges in post-ISIS Iraq.

Christopher D. Kolenda is an Adjunct Senior Fellow at the Center for a New American Security and a Senior Fellow at the Center for Global Policy. He recently served as the Senior Advisor on Afghanistan and Pakistan to the Department of Defense senior leadership and has served four tours in Afghanistan. He was interviewed for the P-WW about changing US strategy in Afghanistan.

Tim Arango is the Baghdad bureau chief for The New York Times. He was interviewed for the P-WW about his seven-year experience reporting on Iraq.

Sahr Muhammedally is a Senior Program Manager at the Center for Civilians in Conflict, leading work on civilian protection and harm mitigation in the Middle East and Asia, as well as US counter-terrorism policy. She was interviewed for the P-WW about civilian protection in the fight against ISIS. 

Sarah Holewinski is a Senior Fellow at the Center for New American Security focusing on responsible use of force in armed conflict. She was interviewed for the P-WW about the lessons learned in Iraq and Afghanistan about civilian protection.

Joost Hiltermann is program director for the Middle East and North Africa for the International Crisis Group. He was interviewed for the P-WW about the problems posed by and challenges for Iraqi Kurdistan and the potential for proxy war in post-ISIL Iraq.

Paul Staniland is Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago, where he co-directs the Program on International Security Policy. He is the author of Networks of Rebellion: Explaining Insurgent Cohesion and Collapse (Cornell University Press, 2014). He was interviewed for the P-WW about the relationship between Afghanistan, Pakistan, and the Taliban.

Kenneth M. Pollack is a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution’s Saban Center for Middle East Policy, where he served as director in 2009-2012. He has previously served as an Iran-Iraq military analyst at the Central Intelligence Agency (1988-1995), and as director for Persian Gulf Affairs at the National Security Council (1999-2001). He was interviewed for the P-WW about the American withdrawal from Iraq, and the problems it created and cycles of political and social crises threatening the Iraqi state.

Jean-François Seznec is a Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Atlantic Council’s Global Energy Center. He is also Managing Partner of the Lafayette Group LLC, a US-based private investment company, and an Adjunct Professor at Georgetown and Johns Hopkins Universities. He was interviewed for the P-WW about Saudi strategies for economic and political development.

Madawi al-Rasheed is Visiting Professor at the Middle East Institute, National University of Singapore. Her latest book is called, Muted Modernists: the Struggle over Divine Politics in Saudi Arabia. She was interviewed for the P-WW about political reform and the monarchy in Saudi Arabia.

Nathan J. Brown is Professor of Political Science and International Affairs and Director of the Institute for Middle East Studies at George Washington University. His latest book is called, When Victory Is Not an Option: Islamist Movements in Arab Politics. He was interviewed for the P-WW about constitutional reform, Islamism, and the presidency in Egypt.

David B. Roberts is an Assistant Professor in the Defence Studies Department at King’s College London. He formerly served as Director of the Qatar office of the Royal United Services Institute for Defence and Security Studies. He was interviewed for the P-WW about unity, tension, and military development within the GCC.

Tom Ginsburg is the Leo Spitz Professor of International Law, Ludwig and Hilde Wolf Research Scholar, and Professor of Political Science at the University of Chicago. He works with numerous international development agencies and foreign governments on legal on constitutional reform, and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was interviewed for the P-WW about the challenges of constitutional drafting in new states.

Fanar Haddad is a Research Fellow at the Middle East Institute of the National University of Singapore. He is the author of Sectarianism in Iraq: Antagonistic Visions of Unity. He was interviewed for the P-WW about national and religious identities in Iraq.

Mohammed Shareef is a Fellow of the Royal Asiatic Society in London, and a lecturer in politics at University of Exeter (United Kingdom) and in international relations at the University of Sulaimani (Iraqi Kurdistan). He is the author of The United States, Iraq and the Kurds: Shock, Awe and Aftermath. He was interviewed for the P-WW about Kurdish nationalist narratives.

Rodger Shanahan is a Research Fellow at the Lowy Institute for International Policy, and is on the staff of the National Security College, Australian National University. He is the author of The Shia of Lebanon: Clans, Parties and Clerics. He was interviewed for the P-WW about Hezbollah’s role in Lebanon.

Joseph Sassoon is a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, where he studies authoritarian regime structures in the Arab World. He is the author of Saddam Hussein’s Ba’ath Party: Inside an Authoritarian Regime. He was interviewed for the P-WW about legitimacy and authoritarianism in Iraq.

Theo Farrell is Professor of War in the Modern World at Kings College London and strategic advisor to the British government on operations in Afghanistan. He was interviewed for the P-WW about his work studying Taliban perspectives on reconciliation and the challenges facing Afghanistan after ISAF.

Abbas Milani is the Hamid & Christina Moghadam Director of Iranian Studies at Stanford University, and a founding co-director of the Iran Democracy Project at the Hoover Institution. Between 1975 and 1979, he was a research fellow at the Iranian Center for Social Research, and a professor of law and political science at the National University of Iran, and later at the University of Tehran, during which time he was imprisoned by the Shah for Marxist teaching. He left Iran following the 1979 Iranian Revolution. He was interviewed for the P-WW about the lessons learned from the 1979 Revolution and understanding the divisions within Iranian society and politics.

Avi Shlaim is an emeritus professor of international relations at Oxford University and a fellow of the British Academy. He is considered one of Israel’s “New Historians,” and is the author of many books, including The Iron Wall: Israel and the Arab World and Collusion Across the Jordan: King Abdullah, the Zionist Movement, and the Partition of Palestine. He was interviewed for the P-WW about contextualizing Zionism.

Harith Hasan is a political analysts who has served as an advisor for governmental and non-governmental organizations in Iraq, and is a former Assistant Professor of Political Science at Baghdad University. He is the Robert G. James Scholar at Risk Fellow at Harvard University and a regular contributor to Al-Monitor. He was interviewed for the P-WW about the character of sectarian identity in Iraq.

John Nagl is the former President of the Center for New American Security and the author of the American military’s Counterinsurgency Field Manual. He served in both Iraq Wars, and retired as a Lieutenant Colonel in the US Army. He was interviewed for the P-WW about the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham.

Aaron David Miller is a vice president at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. He served as a Middle East negotiator in Democratic and Republican administrations, most recently as the Senior Advisor for Arab-Israeli Negotiations. He was interviewed for the P-WW about Arab-Israeli peace process and about the November 2012 fighting in Gaza.

Alexander Cooley is the Tow Professor and Department Chair of Political Science at Barnard College, Columbia University. He was interviewed for the P-WW about the new Great Game in Central Asia.

George Bisharat is a professor of law at the University of California, Hastings College of the Law, and a frequent commentator on Middle East political and legal issues. He was interviewed for the P-WW about the folly of the two-state solution.

Barbara Bodine is the former United States Ambassador to the Republic of Yemen (1997-2001). She served for over 30 years in the US Foreign Service, and is currently Lecturer in Public and International Affairs and Director of the Scholars in the Nation’s Service Initiative at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School. She was interviewed for the P-WW about the USS Cole attack and the lessons it taught US policymakers. 

Marcin Andrzej Piotrowski is an analyst in the International Security Programme of the Polish Institute of International Affairs, specializing in the Persian Gulf, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. He is a former diplomat and Polish Liaison to the US Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan and to the Secretariat of the International Contact Group for Afghanistan and Pakistan. He was interviewed for the P-WW about Poland’s experience in Afghanistan.

Sumaya Bouadi is an undergraduate at the University of Chicago studying political science. She wrote for the Post-War Watch about the roots of the Arab Spring movement in North Africa.

Rosemary Hollis is Professor of Middle East Policy Studies and Director of the Olive Tree Scholarship Program at City University London. She has previously served as Director of Research and Head of the Middle East Program at Chatham House (the Royal Institute of International Affairs) for three years. She was interviewed for the P-WW about Britain’s lessons from Iraq.

Sten Rynning is Professor of Political Science at the University of Southern Denmark, and one of the world’s foremost experts on NATO. His most recent bookNATO in Afghanistan: The Liberal Disconnect, will be released this month by Stanford University Press. He was interviewed for the P-WW about NATO’s successes and failures in Afghanistan.

Stephen Starr lived in Syria from 2007 until February 2012, where he worked as an editor at the Syria Times and then as a freelance reporter. He is also the founder and editor-in-chief of the Near East Quarterly. His book, Revolt in Syria: Eye-Witness to the Uprising, has been released in the United States by Columbia University Press. He was interviewed for the P-WW about the character of Syria’s opposition.

Robert M. Hathaway is director of the Asia Program at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars in Washington, D.C. He previously served for twelve years on the professional staff of the Foreign Affairs Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives, where he specialized in American foreign policy toward Asia. He was interviewed for the P-WW about the Pakistan’s role in the Afghan War.

Michael Bauer is a Senior Researcher in the Research Group on European Affairs and head of the Project on Europe and the Middle East at the Center for Applied Policy Research at the University of Munich. He was interviewed for the P-WW about Al Qaeda in Iraq and the European perspective on terror.

Geoffrey Garrett is the Founder and CEO of the United States Studies Centre and Professor of Political Science at the University of Sydney, and was previously the Dean of the International Institute at the University of California, Los Angeles. He is a frequent contributor to a wide range of Australian media, including The Australian, Australian Financial Review, Sydney Morning Herald, Sky TV, and ABC radio. He was interviewed for the P-WW about the Australian perspective on US foreign policy.

Noah Feldman is Bemis Professor of International Law at Harvard Law School, and a contributing writer for the New York Times Magazine and the Bloomberg View, as well as a Senior Fellow of the Society of Fellows at Harvard University. In 2003 he served as senior constitutional advisor to the Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq under L. Paul Bremer, and subsequently advised members of the Iraqi Governing Council on the drafting of the Transitional Administrative Law, or interim constitution. He was interviewed about Islamic democracy in the Arab World.

Saad Jawad is a Senior Visiting Fellow at the Middle East Centre of the London School of Economics and Political Science, starting in 2010. He taught at the University of Baghdad for more than 30 years, and his research specialties include Iraqi Kurds, the war in Iraq and its effect on the Middle East, and the regional influence of Iraq’s neighbors. He was interviewed for the P-WW about Iraq’s intellectuals and the Iraqi Constitution.

Colin Kahl is Associate professor in the Security Studies Program in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University. From February 2009 to December 2011, he was the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for the Middle East at the Pentagon. He was interviewed for the P-WW about the reasons for not attacking Iran.

David Betz is a Senior Lecturer in the War Studies Department at King’s College London. He is head of the Insurgency Research Group at KCL, and heads a two-year US Defense Department Minerva-funded project on “Strategy and the Network Society.” He is also a Senior Fellow of the Foreign Policy Research Institute, and has advised or worked with the UK Ministry of Defense and the UK’s Government Communications Headquarters on strategic issues, counterinsurgency and stabilization doctrine, cyberspace and cyber strategy. He was interviewed for the P-WW about cyberwar, information- and network-based warfare.

Bruce W. Jentleson is Professor of Public Policy and Political Science at Duke University, where he served from 2000-2005 as Director of the Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy. He served as a Senior Advisor to the US State Department Policy Planning Director from 2009-2011. He was interviewed for the P-WW about unmanned warfare and US strategic doctrine.

F. Gregory Gause, III is professor of political science at the University of Vermont, and was director of the University’s Middle East Studies Program from 1998 to 2008. His research focuses particularly on the Arabian Peninsula and the Persian/Arabian Gulf. He was interviewed for the P-WW about Saudi Arabia’s role in the Middle East.

Joseph S. Nye is the University Distinguished Service Professor, and former Dean of the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. He has served as Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs, Chair of the National Intelligence Council, and Deputy Under Secretary of State for Security Assistance, Science, and Technology. His many publications include Bound to Lead (Basic Books, 1991) and The Future of Power (PublicAffairs; 1 edition, 2011). In 2011, he was named to Foreign Policy Magazine’s list of the top 100 most influential global thinkers. He was interviewed for the P-WW about issues of American and international power.

Amatzia Baram is Professor Emeritus in the Department of Middle Eastern History at the University of Haifa. Between 1984 and 1988 he was a member of a small team advising former Israeli Prime Minister Shimon Peres on Arab and Gulf affairs. Since then he has advised various branches of the Israeli and United States governments under Presidents George H.W. Bush, Clinton, and George W. Bush about Iraq and the Gulf region. He was interviewed for the P-WW about Saddam Hussein’s striking rationality.

Edward Burke is a research fellow on EU foreign policy and defence at the Centre for European Reform in London. From 2010 to 2011 he was Deputy Head of the International Police Coordination Board-Secretariat in Kabul, Afghanistan. Between 2007 and 2010, he worked as a Researcher at the Foundation for International Relations (FRIDE) in Madrid, Spain, focusing on EU policies towards political reform and security in the Middle East. He is a regular contributor to a wide range of international media, including the New York Times, The Guardian, the Irish Times, and El Pais. He was interviewed for the P-WW about Russia’s role and motivations in the Syria crisis.

Jennifer Heath is an independent scholar, curator, award-winning activist and cultural journalist, author/editor of nine books, including A House White With Sorrow: A Ballad for Afghanistan, The Veil: Women Writers on Its History, Lore, and Politics, and Land of the Unconquerable: The Lives of Contemporary Afghan Women (co-edited with Ashraf Zahedi).  She is the founder of Seeds for Afghanistan and the Afghanistan Relief Organization Midwife Training and Infant Care Program. She was interviewed for the P-WW about her memories from and scholarship on Afghanistan.

Mujib Mashal is an Online journalist for Al-Jazeera English in Doha, Qatar. He was born and raised in Kabul, Afghanistan. He was interviewed for the P-WW about his experiences growing up in and reporting on Afghanistan and the United States.

Stephen Biddle is Professor of International Affairs at George Washington University and an Adjunct Senior Fellow for Defense Policy at the Council on Foreign Relations. He served on General Stanley McChrystal’s Initial Strategic Assessment Team in Kabul in 2009, on General David Petraeus’s Joint Strategic Assessment Team in Baghdad in 2007, and as a senior adviser to General Petraeus’s Central Command Assessment Team in Washington, DC, in 2008-2009. He was interviewed about the necessary compromises at the heart of the Afghan War’s end.

Ned Parker is the 2011-2012 Edward R. Murrow press fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations. He served as bureau chief for the Los Angeles Times in Baghdad from spring 2009 to August 2011. Previously, he was the chief Baghdad correspondent for The Times of London from 2006 to 2007 and was based in Iraq from 2003 to 2005 as a reporter for Agence France-Presse. This past winter and spring he reported from Egypt, Libya, and Bahrain on the popular uprisings sweeping the Middle East. He was interviewed for the P-WW about his experiences reporting from Iraq and the country’s future.

Sir Lawrence Freedman is Professor of War Studies and Vice-Principal at King’s College London, and has served as foreign policy advisor to former British Prime Minister Tony Blair. He was elected as a Fellow of the British Academy in 1995 and awarded the “Commander of the British Empire” in 1996. In 1997, he was appointed Official Historian of the Falklands Campaign. Most recently, he was awarded the “Knight Commander of St Michael and St George,” and was appointed in June 2009 to serve as a member of the official inquiry into Britain and the 2003 Iraq War. He was interviewed for the P-WW about Britain and the Iraq War.

Noam Chomsky is the Institute Professor Emeritus of Linguistics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is also an internationally-recognized commentator and thinker about issues of American hegemony. He was interviewed for the P-WW about issues surrounding American power.

Daniel Byman is a professor in the School of Foreign Service and was director of the Security Studies Program and Center for Peace and Security Studies from 2005 until 2010 at Georgetown University. He is also the Director of Research of the Saban Center for Middle East Policy at the Brookings Institution. He has served as a Professional Staff Member with the 9/11 Commission and with the Joint 9/11 Inquiry Staff of the House and Senate Intelligence Committees. He was interviewed for the P-WW about the situation in Syria.

Catherine Lutz is the Thomas J. Watson, Jr. Family Professor of Anthropology and International Studies at Brown University, where she is the chair of the Department of Anthropology. She is also co-director of the Costs of War research project based at Brown’s Watson Institute of International Studies. She was interviewed for the P-WW about US military presence overseas.

Matthew Kroenig is a Stanton nuclear security fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and an assistant professor of government at Georgetown University. From July 2010 to July 2011, he was a Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellow in the Department of Defense, where he worked on Middle East defense policy and strategy. Previously, in 2005, he worked as a strategist in the Office of the Secretary of Defense where he authored the first-ever, U.S. government strategy for deterring terrorist networks. For his work, he was awarded the Office of the Secretary of Defense’s Award for Outstanding Achievement. He was interviewed for the P-WW about the merits of attacking Iran.

Peter D. Feaver is Professor of Political Science and the Director of the Triangle Institute for Security Studies and the Program in American Grand Strategy at Duke University. From June 2005 to July 2007, Prof. Feaver was Special Advisor for Strategic Planning and Institutional Reform on the National Security Council Staff at the White House. He also contributes to the “Shadow Government” blog at Foreign Policy magazine. He responded to the P-WW’s questions about judging success in war.

Zoe H. Wool is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy and Aging Research at Rutgers University. She has conducted ethnographic fieldwork with injured U.S. soldiers and their families rehabilitating at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. Her work on this and other issues related to the U.S. military since 9/11 can be found in peer reviewed journals of Anthropology and Sociology. She was interviewed for the P-WW about her ethnographic fieldwork at Walter Reed.

Rick Halperin is the director of the Embrey Human Rights Program at Southern Methodist University, and has served as a two-time chair on the board of directors of Amnesty International USA. He was interviewed for the P-WW about human rights and the Middle East.

Aaron Hahn Tapper is the Director of the Swig Program in Jewish Studies and Social Justice and current Swig Chair in Judaic Studies at the University of San Francisco. In 2003, he founded Abraham’s Vision, a conflict transformation organization working with American-based populations of Jews, Muslims, Israelis, and Palestinians, for whom he has served as Co-Executive Director since that time. He was interviewed for the P-WW about religion and politics.

Dahr Jamail is the Online News Producer for Al Jazeera English in Doha, Qatar. He spent nine months in Iraq between 2003 and 2009 as one of the few “unembedded” independent US journalists in the country, reporting on the Iraq War and its human costs. He has received the 2008 Martha Gellhorn Award for Journalism, the James Aronson Award for Social Justice Journalism, the Joe A. Callaway Award for Civic Courage, and four Project Censored awards. He was interviewed for the P-WW about his experiences reporting from Baghdad.

William D. Hartung is a Senior Research Fellow in the New America Foundation’s American Strategy Program, specializing in issues of weapons proliferation, the economics of military spending, and alternative approaches to national security strategy. Mr. Hartung is also the director of the Arms and Security Initiative at the Center for International Policy. He was interviewed for the P-WW about re-arming for the future.

Richard K. Betts is the Arnold A. Saltzman Professor of War and Peace Studies in the political science department, Director of the Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies, and Director of the International Security Policy program in the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. He served on the original Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, the National Security Council, and is an occasional consultant to the National Intelligence Council and the Central Intelligence Agency. he was interviewed  for the P-WW about the ‘War on Terror’ and the future of conflict.

Matthew Evangelista is President White Professor of History and Political Science in the Department of Government at Cornell University, where he teaches courses in international and comparative politics. He is the author of five books, including Unarmed Forces: The Transnational Movement to End the Cold War (1999), winner of the Marshall Shulman prize from the American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies and the Jervis-Schroeder Prize from the American Political Science Association. He responded to the P-WW’s questions about the role of war and separatism in the modern political arena.

Karen Culcasi is an assistant professor of Geography at West Virginia University. Her research focuses on critical geopolitical examinations of contested places and identities in the Middle East. She was interviewed for the P-WW about the cartographic construction of the Middle East.

Andrew Bacevich is Professor of International Relations and History at Boston University. A graduate of the U.S. Military Academy, he received his PhD in American Diplomatic History from Princeton University. Before joining the faculty of Boston University, he taught at West Point and Johns Hopkins. Bacevich is the author of many books, the most recent of which is Washington Rules:  America’s Path to War (2010). He answered the Post-War Watch’s questions regarding the notion of American militarism.

William C. Banks is the College of Law Board of Advisors Distinguished Professor at Syracuse University, and the director of Syracuse’s Institute for National Security and Counterterrorism. He has testified before the United States Congress about the legality of military drone-strikes overseas, and is also the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of National Security Law & Policy. He answered the Post-War Watch’s questions regarding the field of National Security Law.

Klaus Larres is a Senior Fellow at the Center for Transatlantic Relations at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), in Washington, DC. He is the Richard M. Krasno Distinguished Professor of History and International Affairs at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He was in Cairo in November 2011 and witnessed the second phase of the Egyptian Revolution. He was interviewed for the P-WW about the second phase of the Arab Spring in Cairo.

Mark Monmonier is distinguished professor of geography at Syracuse University’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs. He is the author of many books, the most recent of which is No Dig, No Fly, No Go: How Maps Restrict and Control (University of Chicago Press, 2010). He was interviewed for the P-WW about the political power of maps.

Michael Wilburn currently studies at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, where he plans to double major in Human Rights and Political Science, and double minor in Arabic and Religious Studies. Michael is also president of SMU College Democrats. He has written for the P-WW about Dealing with Political Islam, and contributed the interview with Professor Halperin.

Paul Scott teaches Western and Eastern History at the Head-Royce School in Oakland, California. In addition to his other courses, he leads an annual seminar exploring the political, religious, and social history of the Islamic World. He has written for the P-WW about the Foundations of Iraqi Instability.


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